RF News

 

 

 

 

Summer is wrapping up, come back to the City FAM! RF has been busy this summer making adding some new equipment, adding new trainers and new BABIES! Congrats Dennis and Annie on Lucas. Gus's forever best friend <3. 

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Meet Remorca's newest trainers, Jillian Schemer and Sharon Armstrong! Follow then on Instagram @jilliann_schembri & @pineapple.yogi 

@jilliann_schembri

@jilliann_schembri

@pineapple.yogi

@pineapple.yogi


We will now be offering discounts on Health Warrior products (Superfood!) and offering Eboost pre-workout and Protein in-house, as well as several other Probiotics, Veggie Fixes, and energy supplements from Eboost. Meg is an ambassador for both now! 

@meg_takacs

@meg_takacs

Workout Motivation Could Come From Just a Few Small Adjustments

If you can't find the motivation to workout, or if you go through periods of loving it, and then periods of being totally unmotivated, your answer could lie in just a few small adjustments. Here are some unconventional ways to motivate yourself again. 

Music Matters: Music really is a motivator. You don't think that when you aren't listening to it, but if you're at work and debating on working out, put on a motivational or meaningful song and force yourself to listen to it and let your mind wander to (hopefully) ambitious thoughts. 

Buy new workout clothes. Materialistic? Maybe. But, it might work for you. Whenever I get a new pair of shoes, I always get really excited to run. Buying new technology could also help you get back in the swing. Subconsciously, I think it holds you accountable. And it makes you guilty if you don't use it. 

Fill your social media feeds with workout motivation. Visuals specifically. Seeing and hearing motivation can wake up your senses and in turn, fire up your motivation. Most of us are on these mediums all day, so why not do ourselves a favor and try it? 

Signing up for a race or a goal. Pay money. No one enjoys wasting money, and then you feel twice as guilty about not working out when you waste it on NOT WORKING OUT. Sign up for an event, or even just a class. Hold yourself accountable. 

What a Week of Working Out Should Consist of

When it comes to your workouts, you should keep it constantly varied. There are 5 key components to every workout program: 

The Big 4: The Back Squat (quads, hamstrings, gluten and hips), Bench Press (Chest, triceps and shoulders), Deadlifts (Glutes, hips, hamstrings and lower back), Overhead press (Back, shoulders, triceps) ALSO, a great perk of these is that they all work core. 

Cardio: If you don't have a ton of time to do long, steady pace cardio on your own, training HIIT style is a great way to still operate at a threshold pace and still receive the metabolic elements of cardio. Also, HIIT style workouts have a greater post-calorie burn. 

Flexibility and Range of Motion: This is CRITICAL! Just as important as working out. Improving your flexibility. Our friends at Hyperice offer a variety of recovery tools that use pressure and vibration to improve the body's overall performance. 

Body Weight Work: Calisthenics! While it's important to strength train with weights, its also important to do body weight training to help build lean muscle and to help maintain cognitive function. 

Muscle Activation Techniques: This total body process is designed to improve the communication between the nervous system and the muscular system. This sort of activation technique helps to identify muscle dysfunction that causes pain in body and finding the source of pain is always beneficial to overall body composition and overall health. 

The Treadmill Don'ts

By: @meg_Takacs - Remorca Fitness Trainer & Running Coach 

Whether you’re a beginner or you’ve been hitting the gym for years, approaching an unfamiliar piece of equipment is intimidating. That’s why we’re tackling “The Don’t List”—things you should never do while using certain pieces of gym equipment. We’re starting with the treadmill.

Treadmill workouts might seem simple on the surface—you hop on, crank up the speed, maybe try an incline—but appearances are deceiving. There’s a right way and a wrong way to get your treadmill workout in. 

Treadmill Workout Don’ts

1. Don’t hold the treadmill when you incline walk

Holding on while you walk on a treadmill defeats the purpose of using your own body weight to burn fat. The action of what is essentially pulling your body weight up a hill is essential to getting the most out of your treadmill workout.

2. Don’t put a towel over the numbers

You need to be mindful of pace and time when you run. There should never be a running workout wherein you are completely oblivious to your statistics. When you go into cruise control mode, it’s easy to lose sight of whether or not you’re improving week to week. Running is all about being mindful and aware.

3. Don’t let the treadmill pull you, you pull the treadmill

During any treadmill workout your mindset matters. Imagine pulling the treadmill with the balls of your feet and propelling yourself instead of the treadmill propelling you. Stay light on your feet and don’t strike the machine with your heels.

4. Don’t let the numbers you see intimidate you

When you increase the speed, immediately look up and allow your body to acclimate naturally. Let your physical body take over without mentally agonizing about the speed number you’ve chosen. Settle into the pace without freaking out.

5. Only use the treadmill for intervals and shorter workouts

Avoid the treadmill for long runs. This may seem counterintuitive (especially in the winter) but many treadmills are hard so it’s basically like you’re running on concrete.

6. Avoid watching TV during all workouts

You have the time you spend on the treadmill to unplug from life. Be mindful when you run and think about your body, the motion, and breathing. Watching TV isn’t going to give you any of that. Run because you want a mental release. It’s also all too easy to zone out to the TV and lose your footing.

What is the Best Time of Day to Run?

By Meg: 

Can't figure out when the best time to run is? Try all three of these times to understand why each could be beneficial, and figure out which one is best for you. Having a good run makes you run again.  

In the Morning: Body temperature is at its lowest. Some people take well to this, and are able to perform more efficiently and more comfortably in the early hours of the morning. Some people also say they perform better in the morning because they have a "clear head. " In my opinion, I would rather wake my body up (see above) and back it with the science. Early morning runs are actually the worst for your body from a scientific standpoint because your bodily functions are not awake, so you'll spend half the run doing that. 

Mid-morning/afternoon: My absolute favorite time to run! Your physical functions have woken up and you've only had to deal with the good kind of stress in the morning: that morning productivity high.  In the morning we all work well. We're riding the wake up high, and loving life. I ride off the momentum of accomplishing things in the morning on my runs. So mid-day is best for me physically and mentally. Also, your lung performance and body temperature are both at an optimal level of efficiency. If you have a good high-protein breakfast, your body will also have had time to get it's energy levels up. There are virtually no negatives associated with running in the afternoon. 

In the Evening/Night: A lot of runners run better in the evening because of the psychology behind it. Think about it; in the morning, we're all feeling like "wow, this is awful."  So, in my opinion it can be better to run later in the day, because you have had time to gather yourself, and perhaps even discover a reason to run. It's better to wake up your body and brain, after you wake up, to give yourself a mental and physical warmup. 

You also run better during the latter part of the day, because you have already had hours of fluctuation in the performance of your body's functions. By fluctuation in body functions, I mean the rhythmic patterns of brain sending signals to your body to do things like eat, walk and think. Now, since your body has had hours of carrying these functions out, you are more geared up and primed to run. In other works, you are ready to neurologically and physically operate more efficiently.  

 

41 of the Hardest Ab Exercises

Check out Livestrong's website for "The 41 Hardest Ab Exercises" 

When it comes to core, make sure you target it in multiple ways. It doesn't just come from doing crunches. It comes from functional, total-body movement too. Deadlifts and movements involving full hip-extension also work your core. 

Make sure when you do just core, you do it as a warmup before lifting, or running/cardio. Core serves to correct your posture and support your spine. So it's good to activate the abs before you run or do strength training because it will help wake up your stabilizers and entire core and in turn, support you through functional movement patterns. Think of the core as the body's powerhouse- the mitochondria of the body. 

You can't out-crunch a bad diet. The secret to abs is to lower your body fat. And you should never  have just an "ab workout," always incorporate it into routines with strength, running. Work it from all angles!